Team Physicians Critical to Athlete Care, Team Success

Standard

Athletes of all levels —from youth leagues to professional — benefit from the expert care offered by a team physician. According to the team physician consensus statement released by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and five other professional organizations, the care of a team physician is a necessary component to providing the best possible medical treatment and care to any athlete. Continue reading

Does Higher-Intensity Exercise Produce More Results?

Standard

Over time, running may produce greater weight loss than walking, especially in men and overweight women, according to research published in the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine. This study, in the April edition of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®, indicates vigorous activity can produce greater weight loss when compared to moderate-level exercise. Continue reading

Time to Stop Prejudice Against Chinese Athletes

Standard

Since the opening of the London Olympic Games last week, a small number of Western media have indulged in making up stories about  China that range from labeling Chinese athletes “medal machines” to doping claims based on no evidence.

By doing so, the Western writers have demonstrated an arrogance and prejudice against Chinese athletes that has ignited widespread criticism from all around the world.

Continue reading

Academy Offers New Bachelor’s Degree in Strength and Conditioning

Standard

The United States Sports Academy is now offering the only online bachelor’s degree in Strength and Conditioning that prepares students in all aspects of the field, as well as sports management.

Strength and conditioning job opportunities are expanding and the knowledge required for sports professionals in the field is also increasing. That’s why as part of its 40th anniversary, the Academy’s Board of Trustees Executive Committee approved the launch of the new program.

Continue reading

Is Running Bad For Your Knees?

Standard

An ongoing health question revolves around whether or not running is bad for a person’s knees.  It is no secret that for every pound of weight on a person’s body the impact from running is such that at the point of impact on the knee the joint faces a force of four times body weight.  In other words, a 150 pound person exerts the force of a 600 pound weight on his or her knees with every step taken during the act of running.

Continue reading

Making the Case for Sports Medicine Informatics

Standard

Federal regulations as part of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 provide thirty (30) billion dollars of incentives in the form of additional Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement for physicians who can demonstrate “meaningful use” of “certified” EHR or electronic health records technology.  Payments to physicians as part of this program started in May 2011.  Physicians who practice sports medicine are eligible to receive such payments provided that their clinical information systems meet government requirements.   These incentives have created a new market opportunity for software vendors who can best meet the needs of sports medicine practices.

Continue reading

Body Composition Devices Under Evaluation

Standard

Athletes are always looking for an edge when it comes to diet and training.  Technological advances over the past 25 years have led to major changes in the way in which athletes approach their training.  One of these athletes is Stephen Okai of the University of Mobile in Alabama.

Okai is a two-time NAIA All-America soccer player, but the University of Mobile midfielder always is looking for ways to improve his performance. That’s why he volunteered for a United States Sports Academy body composition study.

Continue reading

Dureson Death Back in the News

Standard

This blog has run a number of stories over the past year or so about the growing realization in the sporting world about just how serious an issue the incidence of concussions is for athletes.  In particular, a story was posted on March 11, 2011 concerning the tragic suicide of former NFL All-Pro defensive back, Dave Duerson, who left a note asking that his brain be removed and submitted for research being conducted at Boston University into traumatic brain encephalopathy (CTE).

Continue reading

Nader Calls for Concussion Test to Become Mandatory in Youth Sports

Standard

More than 400,000 concussions occurred in high school sports during a recent school year. That fact is alarming given that the brains of youth are not full developed, making them more susceptible to damage.

The danger to our young athletes from concussions has leading American activist Ralph Nader calling for mandatory implementation of the King-Devick concussion test in high school and youth sports throughout the nation.

Continue reading