IOC President Expresses Confidence in Sochi 2014 Winter Games

 

IOC President Thomas Bach has expressed confidence that the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games next February would be “excellent, unique and a perfect stage for the athletes to perform at their best.”

Former fencer and 9th International Olympic Committee president Dr. Thomas Bach

Summarizing his meetings with the Sochi 2014 organizers and government officials, including Russian President Vladimir Putin, and having visited Sochi’s coastal and mountain clusters, Dr Bach said:

“The progress the organizers have made since winning the right to host the Games seven years ago is tremendous, but more importantly, they have delivered on their commitment to place the athletes at the heart of these Games,” said President Bach, as the countdown clock hit 100 days to go to the start of the Games. “I can confidently say that all the athletes will be warmly welcomed and they will be suitably impressed with the Athletes’ Villages and competition venues. We can expect to see some terrific performances in February as a result.”

On his third day of a four-day visit to the Black Sea city, President Bach attended the unveiling of the Sochi 2014 Games-time uniforms and met with students of the Russian International Olympic University (sport intern 20131030a). Having joined Putin for the official opening of the Adler Railway Terminal on Monday, Bach – during a private meeting with the Russian President – received fresh assurances that there will be no discrimination against the LGBT community during the Games.

“All visitors traveling to Sochi for the Games regardless of race, gender or sexual  orientation, will be welcomed here equally – this has been made very clear by the Russian authorities,” said Bach in an IOC press release. “The Games themselves are open to all, free of discrimination, and that applies to spectators, officials, media, and, of course, athletes. This is a principal pillar of the Olympic Movement that will be upheld in Sochi.”

Dr. Bach was also pleased with the efforts of the local organizers to ensure a lasting legacy for Russia following the Games. This includes improved infrastructure, new sports facilities, an increase in volunteerism, and the Russian International Olympic University, which opened earlier this year to train professionals in sport business management based specifically on the needs of the Olympic Movement. Students at the university were afforded the opportunity of speaking directly to Bach during an hour-long Q&A session.

“There will be many lasting legacies from Sochi 2014, including the RIOU, which is committed to producing graduates of the highest caliber to work in the world of sport,” said Bach. “The Olympic Movement as a whole will benefit from the establishment of the university, as, of course, will Russian sport.”

 

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