American Wheelchair Racer McFadden Makes History With Marathon Grand Slam

 

American wheelchair racer Tatyana McFadden made history today when she won the women’s wheelchair race of the New York City Marathon to become the first person to secure the grand slam of the four major marathons – Boston, London, Chicago and New York – in one year.

The Russian-born athlete blew away the field, finishing 3min 40sec ahead of Japan’s Wakako Tsuchida, to complete the marathon clean sweep.

American wheelchair racer Tatyana McFadden made history today when she won the women's wheelchair race of the New York City Marathon to become the first person to secure the grand slam of the four major marathons - Boston, London, Chicago and New York - in one year.

This was the fourth time McFadden had competed in the race, with punctures resigning her to a sixth and third place finish in 2009 and 2011 respectively.

In 2010 she breezed to victory, finishing almost six minutes ahead of her nearest rival, and, with her wheelchair staying puncture free again this year, she managed to finish the race in 1hour 59min 13sec. The win adds to an outstanding year for the 24-year-old, who also made history at the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) Athletics World Championships in July by becoming the first woman to win six gold medals in one event.It also follows a successful showing at London 2012, where she claimed gold in the T54 400, 800 and 1500 metres.She is now aiming to qualify for Sochi 2014 in cross country skiing.
Switzerland’s Marcel Hug won today’s marathon in the men’s wheelchair race, finishing in 1:40:14, a fraction ahead of South African Ernst van Dyk.Australia’s Kurt Fearnley followed the pair to the finish line in 1:40:15.Switzerland’s Manuela Schär came third in the women’s wheelchair race in 2:03:53.
Contact the writer of this story at paul.osborne@insidethegames.biz. Inside the Games is an online blog of the London Organizing Committee that staged the 2012 London Games. The blog continues to cover issues that are important to the Olympic Movement. This article is reprinted here with permission of the blog editors.
 

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