Home Pro

Teenage Bowler Converts Rare 7-10 Split

977
0
Anthony Neuer became the fourth bowler in 59 years to convert a 7-10 split on television. Photo: PBA

By Fred Cromartie, Ed.D. |

Yes, I am writing about a very rare accomplishment in the sport of bowling. Some might come at me with the argument that bowling is not a sport, but let me simply state that bowling is a major sport business and a sport with many leagues and tournaments played around the world. Bowling tournaments are held locally, regionally, nationally and globally, they have prize money for winners and tournaments and bowlers have sponsorships and many tournaments are televised. 

I’ll admit that I have watched bowling tournaments on TV often and happened to see the converted rare 7-10 split accomplished by Anthony Neuer (“Ginger Assassin”) of Lewisburg, Pa., in April. The 18-year-old converted a 7-10 split—the game’s most difficult spare—during a U.S. Open semifinal match in Reno, Nev. The feat was broadcast on Fox Sports, and it was just the fourth time in history that a professional bowler hit a 7-10 split during a televised event.  

Even in professional bowling (tenpins), the best bowlers in the world with a 15-pound ball when faced with struggle with a formation those of us who have bowled have encountered before: the 7-10 split. Also called “goal posts” or “bed posts,” this is when the back left and back right pins are left standing after the first shot.

Televised 7–10 spares are far more rare even than televised 300 games. In the history of televised bowling, there have been 32 perfect games on TV. The 7-10 is only converted about 0.7 of the time by professional bowlers.  Some bowlers say the 7-10 split is one of the hardest shots in the game.

I for one will remember the time I watched Anthony Neuer the “Ginger Assassin” make bowling history.

Dr. Cromartie is the Director of Doctoral Studies at the United States Sports Academy.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.