Hail to the Whippets!

 

A few weeks ago, I was honored to attend the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the Mobile County School’s (MCTS) last undefeated state champion football and baseball teams. The Whippets’ football team went 10 – 0, defeating Carver High of Montgomery 12 – 0 in the 1966 championship game. The baseball team, under legendary coach, Curtis Horton, went undefeated for the second consecutive year, joining the football team as state champs.

Even though Brown vs. the Board of Education had made school segregation illegal in 1954, these teams of the 1960s were still not allowed to compete against white schools. Their championships came under the auspices of the Alabama Interscholastic Athletic Association, the black counterpart of the Alabama High School Athletic Association.

Dr. Stephen L. Butler is the Dean of Academic Affairs at the United States Sports Academy. He also hosts the Academy’s weekly Sports Talk program and is the resident baseball junkie.

Dr. Stephen L. Butler is the Dean of Academic Affairs at the United States Sports Academy. He also hosts the Academy’s weekly Sports Talk program and is the resident baseball junkie.

“These athletes had to cobble together used equipment, such as cleats and broken baseball bats held together with tape and nails. They played in second-rate facilities and sometimes even on makeshift fields on cow pastures” (USSA, 2013). Unable to compete against their White contemporaries, the Whippets had to be satisfied with being the best Black team in the state. They also had to deal with the fact that they would not be recruited by major colleges and took their talents to small schools around the country.

Mobile has a rich history when it comes to baseball. The home of Hank Aaron and several other Hall of Famers, Mobile’s tradition would not be nearly as impressive without the athletes who competed for the MCTS Whippets. How many high schools in America can claim that the starting leftfielder and centerfielder for a world champion played together at their school? MCTS can! After baseball was restarted by coach Horton in the 1959 – 1960 school year, the first two teams featured Cleon Jones and Tommie Agee. Jones and Agee were two of the heroes of the 1969 “Miracle” Mets who defeated the heavily favored Baltimore Orioles in five games to win the Mets’ first World Series title.

The “Whippets Pride Luncheon” was a celebration of these great teams from the 1960s. Coach Horton and his pitching coach, Marcine Chatman were there along with several members of those championship teams. As a sports junkie, it was awesome for me to just sit there and listen to them tell stories about their friends and teammates. It was also fascinating to listen to a speech by one of their favorite teachers, Mrs. Valena McCants (Class of 1941).

There are two things I will always remember about meeting these men and women. First, in addition to being great athletes, they were all wonderful people; who became, teachers, doctors, clergymen, and wonderful role models to the young men and women of Mobile. Second, I never heard one complaint or one ounce of bitterness about the fact that they were not allowed to play with or against White athletes. They were all proud to be Whippets and I was extremely proud to be among them for two hours.

For more stories about these great black athletes, click here

Reference

Dr. Stephen L. Butler is the Dean of Academic Affairs at the United States Sports Academy. He also hosts the Academy’s weekly Sports Talk program and is the resident baseball junkie.

 

6 Comments

  1. Brandon Spradley September 12, 2016 at 10:20 am

    Great article. Glad the event was a success.

     
  2. Anderson Flen September 12, 2016 at 3:34 pm

    Dr. Butler I am just returning from a brief vacation. Your words brought joy to my spirit when I read your outstanding comments. I am truly honored by your insight and friendship. The players, coaches and teachers will find your comments both inspiring and rewarding to know that their works are appreciated and valued by others.

    The players from those winning teams know that we gained something that went beyond and deeper than being winners on the fields of sport. We gained ever lasting and unselfish love from our teachers, staff and one another.

     
    • Steve Butler September 18, 2016 at 8:57 pm

      I just heard that Coach Chatman passed away. I am so sorry for the Whippets’ loss. I am glad I had the chance to meet him.

       
  3. Fannie Bush September 12, 2016 at 4:25 pm

    Great article Dr. Butler. It showed true MCTS spirit.

     
  4. Minnie Dewberry September 12, 2016 at 8:38 pm

    Thank you, Dr. Butler, for embracing the Whippets’ spirit by attending the Pride Luncheon and by sharing comments with others in your article. I am personally thankful for my exposure to the Academy by way of the president of our Association, Mr. Flen.

     
  5. Donney Howze September 16, 2016 at 8:47 pm

    Super super article, Dr Butler. Happy to hear of the success of the luncheon. makes me proud to be a WHIPPET. Hope to hear of more affaires of this type.

     

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